How To Read a Graphic Novel

For many of us in the group this is our first foray into graphic novels. In case you needed a little background on how to approach or read graphic novels, here’s a a helpful guide from artist/writer/creator Jessica Abel and a TEDx conference video from Associate Dartmouth Professor Michael Chaney that give a little background on why comics are “serious” now, how you go about reading them and why graphic novels contain an intimacy or power that print novels and movies do not.

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Interview with Roz Chast

Here is a video interview Roz Chast did at the Miami Book Fair:

The Next Book: Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

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The October book will be Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?  by Roz Chast. Reminder: the discussion for this book will be October 24th from 7-8pm in the 3rd floor Board Room. As always there are copies available behind the Circulation Desk for people who wish to join us for the discussion or just read what we’re reading.

Destination Earth (1956)

Mentioned on p. 24 here is Destination Earth.

Chinatown

Here’s some more on the history of Chinatowns, their necessity, and their place in society now.

PBS: Chinatown Resource Guide 

Chicago Chinatown Chamber of Commerce: The History of Chinatown/Visitor’s Guide (PDF)

HuffingtonPost: How Racism Created America’s Chinatowns

Chinatownology: Chinatowns of the World

Mother Nature Network: 10 Best Chinatowns in the US

History of Chinese Immigration

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Courtesy of UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library

If you want to learn more about the history of Chinese immigration to America, check out these sources:

Migration Policy Institute: Chinese Immigrants in the United States

Department of State, Office of the Historian: Chinese Immigration and the Chinese Exclusion Acts

PBS, History Detectives: The Life of Chinese Immigrant

National Women’s History Museum: Chinese American Woman: A History of Resilience and Resistance

Golden Venture: Chinese Immigration to the US

University of California: Pictures of 20th Century Immigration

Chinese Food Menus

As I mentioned at our previous book discussion I found two treasure troves of old menus from Chinese restaurants. One is from the New York Public Library and the other from the Los Angeles Public Library.

As a word of warning: neither of these sites are particularly user friendly. Best practice is to just scroll through and see all the cool stuff.

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