Ta-Nehisi Coates: A Reading List

The author gave a talk with the New York Review of Books and the New York Public Library made a list of books he had recommended in the talk. In the comments readers give their personal recommendations as well.

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Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulivard

Here’s a Google Map of the author’s Blatimore neighborhood. Like before, take a walk around with Google’s street feature.

 

August’s Book: Between the World And Me by Ta-Nehisi Coats

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This month I’m encouraging you to listen to the audiobook version of the book. If you choose to read over listen to the book, that is fine. The discussion will be August 28. If you have a friend who wants to join the discussion they can pick up a copy at the circulation desk.

Reactions to Hillbilly Elegy

Here are some reactions from a few people who identify as ‘hillbillies’ and more established media members responding to Vance’s book.

R. Mike Burr: The Self-Serving Hustle of “Hillbilly Elegy”

Aaron M. Renn: Culture, Circumstance, and Agency: Reflections on Hillbilly Elegy

G.W. Para: Hillbilly Fallacy

Elizabeth Catte: For the good of the poor and common people: What Hillbilly Elegy gets wrong about Appalachia’s working class

Mona Charen: What Hillbilly Elegy Reveals About Trump and America

Hillbilly Migration

One of the things brought up by Vance is about the ‘Hillbilly Migration’ from Kentucky to other states through Rt. 23. Here are some articles about that migration, one of which is about that migration to Chicago’s neighborhood of Uptown.

Chicago Mag: Chicago’s Hillbilly Problem During the Great Migration

NewCity: Hillbilly Heaven: Chicago’s Other Migration fro the South

Chicago Reader: Norma Lee Browning Vs. The Hillbillies

AppalachianHistory.net: Where the Hillbilly Highway Ends

Forbes: Rust-Belt Cities And Moving To Opportunity: It’s Time To Get Back On The ‘Hillbilly Highway’

L.A. Times: Urban Appalachians Find Pride in Hillbilly Heritage

Civil War and PTSD

I think something important to bring up when it comes to this book is the idea of Post Traumatic Stress and its effect on W.C. Minor. First, here are definitions of PTSD by the National Institute for Mental Health as well as the American Psychological Association.

Here are articles that address this idea of PTSD and the Civil War. While at the time they would not have recognized mental disorders in the way we do today, I think it’s worthwhile to explore this subject on how the perception of mental illness has changed or not changed from the 19th century until now.

New York Times – PTSD and the Civil War

Smithsonian Institute – Did Civil War Soldiers Have PTSD?

U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs – History of PTSD in Veterans: Civil War to DSM-V

History Welfare Network- Dying to Get Home: PTSD in the Civil War

 

Destination Earth (1956)

Mentioned on p. 24 here is Destination Earth.

Chinatown

Here’s some more on the history of Chinatowns, their necessity, and their place in society now.

PBS: Chinatown Resource Guide 

Chicago Chinatown Chamber of Commerce: The History of Chinatown/Visitor’s Guide (PDF)

HuffingtonPost: How Racism Created America’s Chinatowns

Chinatownology: Chinatowns of the World

Mother Nature Network: 10 Best Chinatowns in the US

History of Chinese Immigration

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Courtesy of UC Berkeley, Bancroft Library

If you want to learn more about the history of Chinese immigration to America, check out these sources:

Migration Policy Institute: Chinese Immigrants in the United States

Department of State, Office of the Historian: Chinese Immigration and the Chinese Exclusion Acts

PBS, History Detectives: The Life of Chinese Immigrant

National Women’s History Museum: Chinese American Woman: A History of Resilience and Resistance

Golden Venture: Chinese Immigration to the US

University of California: Pictures of 20th Century Immigration

Chinese Food Menus

As I mentioned at our previous book discussion I found two treasure troves of old menus from Chinese restaurants. One is from the New York Public Library and the other from the Los Angeles Public Library.

As a word of warning: neither of these sites are particularly user friendly. Best practice is to just scroll through and see all the cool stuff.

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